Hapi - God of the Nile Inundation: As a water god, Hapi was a deity of fertility. He is depicted as a blue or green man with the false beard of the pharaoh on his chin and having large pendulous breasts and paunch.
Hapi - God of the Nile Inundation
Hapi - God of the Nile Inundation

Hapi - God of the Nile Inundation

Titles: Lord of the fishes and birds of the marshes
Symbols: Running Water, Papyrus and Lotus
Cult Center: No specific Cult Centre

As a water god, Hapi was a deity of fertility. He was particularly associated with the annual flooding of the Nile and was thought to be control of the water during the floods. He was also known as 'Lord of the Fishes and Birds of the Marshes'. He is depicted as a blue or green man with the false beard of the pharaoh on his chin and having large pendulous breasts and paunch.

As a water god, Hapi was a deity of fertility. He was particularly associated with the annual flooding of the Nile and was thought to be control of the water during the floods. He was also known as 'Lord of the Fishes and Birds of the Marshes'. He is depicted as a blue or green man with the false beard of the pharaoh on his chin and having large pendulous breasts and paunch.

Hapi was also both god of Upper and Lower Egypt - this duality was shown by having twin Hapi deities, as can be seen of the sides of the Colossus of Memnon, one wearing the papyrus of the north (Upper Egypt) as a headdress, the other wearing the south's (Lower Egypt) lotus as a headdress. The Upper Egyptian Hapi was called 'Hap-Meht' while the Lower Egyptian Hapi was known as 'Hap-Reset'.

Twin Gods HapiThey were depicted together, pouring water from a carried vase or together, tying the two plants of the northern or southern region into a knot with the sema hieroglyph, symbolising the union of Upper and Lower Egypt. He was the husband of the vulture goddess, Nekhbet in Lower Egypt, and of the cobra goddess Uatchet (Uatch-Ura, Wadjet) in Upper Egypt.

During the inundation flood, the Egyptians would throw offerings, amulets and other sacrifices into the Nile at certain places, sacred to Hapi. Hapi was thought to come with the inundation (the 'Arrival of Hapi') with a retinue of crocodile gods and frog goddesses, and the sacrifices were given in the hopes that the flood would not be too high, nor too low. During inundation, statues of Hapi were carried about through the towns and villages so that the people could honor and pray to him.

There are no known temples of Hapi, but his statues and reliefs are found in the temples of other deities. He was worshiped throughout the land of Egypt, but especially at Aswan and Gebel El-Silisila.

Hymn To Hapi

Hail to thee, O Nile! Who manifests thyself over this land, and comes to give life to Egypt!

Come and prosper!
Come and prosper!
O Nile, come and prosper!
O you who make men to live through his flocks and his flocks through his orchards!
Come and prosper, come,
O Nile, come and prosper!