Egyptian Noblewoman's Tomb Found: The tomb has been identified as belonging to a woman named Isisnofret—possibly the granddaughter of Pharaoh Ramses II, who reigned during the 13th century B.C.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Ancient Cult Chapels, Egyptian Noblewoman's Tomb Found
Ancient Cult Chapels, Egyptian Noblewoman's Tomb Found
Ancient Cult Chapels, Egyptian Noblewoman's Tomb Found

A 3,000-year-old noblewoman's tomb complex has been uncovered in Egypt, archaeologists announced Tuesday.

The tomb has been identified as belonging to a woman named Isisnofret—possibly the granddaughter of Pharaoh Ramses II, who reigned during the 13th century B.C.

Hieroglyphics on a sarcophagus in the tomb identify Isisnofret as a spst, or noblewoman—an honorific reserved for women of the royal family or of otherwise exceptional status.

The tomb complex includes the base of a pyramid, a monumental gateway, a colonnaded courtyard, and an antechamber with three cult chapels, according to the team from Japan's Waseda University that has been excavating the site since 1991.

Common in New Kingdom (1539 to 1075 B.C.) tomb complexes, cult chapels frequently hosted the deceased's family on feast days. Relatives would often eat and make offerings of food and other items to be used by the dead, according to Ray Johnson, director of the University of Chicago Oriental Institute's Epigraphic Survey, who was not involved in the project.

Full Story: National Geographic News »

[Image: Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities]

Viewed: 3966 TimesDate: 06/03/2009