A wall carving discovered in an Egyptian tomb four decades ago was first made controversial by archeologists who later argued the image of two men embracing represented an ancient depiction of homosexuality.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egyptian images: Gay couple or conjoined twins?
Ancient Egyptian images: Gay couple or conjoined twins?
Ancient Egyptian images: Gay couple or conjoined twins?

A wall carving discovered in an Egyptian tomb four decades ago was first made controversial by archeologists who later argued the image of two men embracing represented an ancient depiction of homosexuality. Now a renewed debate surrounds the image, as one Egyptologist argues it's not a gay relationship represented by the stone carving but a pair of Siamese twins.

A wall carving discovered in an Egyptian tomb four decades ago was first made controversial by archeologists who later argued the image of two men embracing represented an ancient depiction of homosexuality. Now a renewed debate surrounds the image, as one Egyptologist argues it's not a gay relationship represented by the stone carving but a pair of Siamese twins.

According to a report in The New York Times, it was in 1964, outside Cairo, near the famous Step Pyramid in the necropolis of Saqqara and a short drive from the Sphinx and the breathtaking pyramids at Giza, that a newfound tomb yielded the wall art in its most sacred chamber. The image of two men together included their names inscribed above: Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep. Though not of the nobility, they were highly esteemed in the palace as the chief manicurists of the king, sometime from 2380 to 2320 B.C., in the time known as the fifth dynasty of the Old Kingdom. Grooming the king was an honored occupation.

View Full Story: Advocate.com

Viewed: 3915 TimesDate: 21/12/2005