A team of archaeologists has rebuilt an ancient glass furnace using local sand near an excavated site in Egypt following the same methods used by Egyptians some 3,000 years ago.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Archaeologists rebuild Ancitent Egyptian glass furnace
Archaeologists rebuild Ancitent Egyptian glass furnace
Archaeologists rebuild Ancitent Egyptian glass furnace

A team of archaeologists has rebuilt an ancient glass furnace using local sand near an excavated site in Egypt following the same methods used by Egyptians some 3,000 years ago. It was previously thought that the ancient Egyptians might have imported their glass from the Near East during that time.

A team of archaeologists has rebuilt an ancient glass furnace using local sand near an excavated site in Egypt following the same methods used by Egyptians some 3,000 years ago. It was previously thought that the ancient Egyptians might have imported their glass from the Near East during that time.

But with reconstructing the glass furnace, the excavation team led by Cardiff University professor Paul Nicholson proved that the ancient Egyptians were not importing glass, rather they were making it by themselves using local sand.

Nicholson is the leader of an Egypt Exploration Society team working on the world's earliest glassmaking site located on the banks of the Nile at Amarna in the modern Egyptian province of Minya, some 312 km south of the Egyptian capital Cairo. The site dates back to the reign of Akhanaten (1352 B.C. to 1336 B.C.), just a few years before the rule of Tutankhamun.

View Full Story: Malaysia Sun

Viewed: 2964 TimesDate: 16/12/2007