With modern technology and a little bit of luck, archaeologists hope to solve two of ancient Egypt's mysteries next week in a live television broadcast.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Egyptian Pyramid Mysteries Live on TV
Egyptian Pyramid Mysteries Live on TV
Egyptian Pyramid Mysteries Live on TV

With modern technology and a little bit of luck, archaeologists hope to solve two of ancient Egypt's mysteries next week in a live television broadcast. The scientists will attempt to probe the inside of a blocked shaft in the Great Pyramid of Giza, and will also open the oldest intact sarcophagus found in modern times.

Zahi Hawass, director of Egypt's antiquities and a National Geographic explorer-in residence, stands beside the oldest intact sarcophagus found in modern times. Both have been sealed for more than 4,000 years, their contents unknown.

With modern technology and a little bit of luck, archaeologists hope to solve two of ancient Egypt's mysteries next week in a live television broadcast. The scientists will attempt to probe the inside of a blocked shaft in the Great Pyramid of Giza, and will also open the oldest intact sarcophagus found in modern times.

Zahi Hawass, director of Egypt's antiquities and a National Geographic explorer-in residence, stands beside the oldest intact sarcophagus found in modern times. Both have been sealed for more than 4,000 years, their contents unknown.

In Pyramids Live: Secret Chambers Revealed, presented by the National Geographic Channel, Egyptologist Zahi Hawass and his team will use a customized robot similar to those used to search for survivors of last year's attack on the World Trade Center to peer into a narrow shaft that opens into the queen's chamber of the Great Pyramid.

View Full Story: National Geographic

Viewed: 2808 TimesDate: 16/09/2002