A massive, headless statue of a Greek king has been found in the ruins of an ancient Egyptian temple, adding to evidence that the structure could be the final resting place of Marc Antony and Cleopatra, excavation leaders say.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Headless Egypt King Statue Found At Taposiris Magna
Headless Egypt King Statue Found At Taposiris Magna
Headless Egypt King Statue Found At Taposiris Magna

A massive, headless statue of a Greek king has been found in the ruins of an ancient Egyptian temple, adding to evidence that the structure could be the final resting place of Marc Antony and Cleopatra, excavation leaders say.

For the past five years archaeologists have been searching around the temple of Taposiris Magna, about 28 miles (45 kilometers) west of the port city of Alexandria, in hopes of finding the couple's graves.

The newfound black granite statue—which stands about 6 feet (1.8 meters) without its head—is thought to be of King Ptolemy IV, because an unattached cartouche carved of the same type of stone and bearing his name was found near the figure's base.

Ptolemy IV was one of several Greek royals who ruled Egypt during the Ptolemaic period, from 332 to 30 B.C.

In addition to the headless statue, the Egyptian-Dominican dig team found an inscription, written in Greek and hieroglyphics, in the foundation deposits of one of the temple's corners. The writing says Ptolemy IV—who ruled from 221 to 205 B.C.—commissioned the temple.

Full Story: National Geographic »

Viewed: 2899 TimesDate: 19/05/2010