IN 1817, the showman and engineer Giovanni Battista Belzoni discovered the Egyptian tomb of Pharaoh Seti I in pristine condition.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Mummy Dearest
Mummy Dearest
Mummy Dearest

IN 1817, the showman and engineer Giovanni Battista Belzoni discovered the Egyptian tomb of Pharaoh Seti I in pristine condition. He cast its walls in wax, and took chunks of it with him to London, where he created the world’s first large-scale replica of an Egyptian tomb. In doing so, The Great Belzoni set off a craze for Egyptology in Middle England, while leaving a badly damaged site behind in the Valley Of The Kings.

IN 1817, the showman and engineer Giovanni Battista Belzoni discovered the Egyptian tomb of Pharaoh Seti I in pristine condition. He cast its walls in wax, and took chunks of it with him to London, where he created the world’s first large-scale replica of an Egyptian tomb. In doing so, The Great Belzoni set off a craze for Egyptology in Middle England, while leaving a badly damaged site behind in the Valley Of The Kings.

Belzoni’s replica was not motivated by concerns for conservation. But it did provide an answer to the modern-day question of how to welcome thousands of tourists into the Valley Of The Kings without letting their sweat, breath, feet and hands destroy the very tombs they came to see. Today, new technology is capable of recreating the tombs in every detail, without recourse to Belzoni’s wax and pick-axe.

View Full Story: Sunday Herald

Viewed: 3085 TimesDate: 20/11/2005