Egyptologists have discovered two 3,400-year-old statues of the lioness-headed war goddess Sekhmet and a rare statue depicting a king with Nubian features.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Statues of goddess, Kushite king found
Statues of goddess, Kushite king found
Statues of goddess, Kushite king found

Egyptologists have discovered two 3,400-year-old statues of the lioness-headed war goddess Sekhmet and a rare statue depicting a king with Nubian features, a research team said Monday. The statues were found at the temple of 18th-dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III in Luxor. Experts believe the statues were excavated from elsewhere, then hidden at the temple either for later sale or to protect them from robbers.

Egyptologists have discovered two 3,400-year-old statues of the lioness-headed war goddess Sekhmet and a rare statue depicting a king with Nubian features, a research team said Monday. The statues were found at the temple of 18th-dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III in Luxor. Experts believe the statues were excavated from elsewhere, then hidden at the temple either for later sale or to protect them from robbers.

The two Sakhmet statues date to the same 18th-dynasty (circa 1533-1292 B.C.) period as most of the finds in the area. The third find is believed to be a Kushite ruler in the 25th-dynasty (circa 767-656 B.C.). Kush was south of ancient Egypt in Nubia, now mostly part of Sudan.

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Viewed: 2902 TimesDate: 30/01/2006