Hatshepsut Khenmet-Amun was the second-known woman to rule Egypt, she became co-regent, along with her young stepson, after her husband and half-brother Thutmose II died in 1504 BC.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
The Lost Queen
The Lost Queen
The Lost Queen

Hatshepsut Khenmet-Amun (the United of Amun in Front of the Nobles) was quite a woman. The second-known woman to rule Egypt, she became co-regent, along with her young stepson, after her husband and half-brother Thutmose II died in 1504 BC. The arrangement lasted just two years before Hatshepsut claimed the title of Pharaoh for her own. For the next 18 years, she was one of the most successful of the ancient rulers, male or female.

Hatshepsut Khenmet-Amun (the United of Amun in Front of the Nobles) was quite a woman. The second-known woman to rule Egypt, she became co-regent, along with her young stepson, after her husband and half-brother Thutmose II died in 1504 BC. The arrangement lasted just two years before Hatshepsut claimed the title of Pharaoh for her own. For the next 18 years, she was one of the most successful of the ancient rulers, male or female.

After her death in 1482 BC, her stepson, Thutmose III, whom she had kept from the throne, took power. In revenge, it is believed, Thutmose III ordered his stepmother’s memory erased from history. Images of Hatshepsut and cartouches bearing her name were chiseled off walls. Her massive obelisks in the Luxor Temple were bricked over. Her statues were broken and buried in a pit. The queen’s name was removed from official histories and her mummified remains, except for one canopic jar, were lost.

View Full Story: Egypt Today

Viewed: 3387 TimesDate: 07/08/2007