King Tutankhamen drank red wine, says a researcher who analyzed very dry traces of the vintage found in his tomb.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Tutankhamun Drank Red Wine, Researcher Says
Tutankhamun Drank Red Wine, Researcher Says
Tutankhamun Drank Red Wine, Researcher Says

King Tutankhamen drank red wine, says a researcher who analyzed very dry traces of the vintage found in his tomb. Guasch-Jane also discovered that the most valued drink in ancient Egypt, shedeh, was made of red grapes.

Wine bottles from King Tutankhamun‘s time were labeled with the name of the product, the year of harvest, the source and the vine grower, Guasch-Jane said, but did not include the color of the wine.

King Tutankhamen drank red wine, says a researcher who analyzed very dry traces of the vintage found in his tomb. Guasch-Jane also discovered that the most valued drink in ancient Egypt, shedeh, was made of red grapes.

Wine bottles from King Tutankhamun‘s time were labeled with the name of the product, the year of harvest, the source and the vine grower, Guasch-Jane said, but did not include the color of the wine.

To test her method, Guasch-Jane scraped residue from wine jars owned by the British Museum and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Two of the jars came from King Tut‘s tomb, discovered by English archaeologist Howard Carter in 1922.

Winemaking dates to 5400 B.C., according to American molecular archaeologist Patrick McGovern, who discovered the earliest known traces of grape residue in northern Iran in 1994.

Research shows that ancient Egyptian kings and members of the upper class drank wine regularly, but common people consumed it only during festivals and special occasions, Guasch-Jane said. Wine was offered to gods in ceremonies, and kings were buried with jars of wine and food similar to what they consumed when they were alive, she said.

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Viewed: 2745 TimesDate: 26/10/2005