Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities and the Getty Conservation Institute have entered into a six-year partnership for the conservation and management of the Valley of the Queens.
Per-Ankh: Ancient Egypt
Valley of the Queens gets a Getty assist
Valley of the Queens gets a Getty assist
Valley of the Queens gets a Getty assist

Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities and the Getty Conservation Institute have entered into a six-year partnership for the conservation and management of the Valley of the Queens, one of the world's most important archeological sites. Building on an earlier collaborative effort which conserved wall paintings in the tomb of Nefertari the new project calls for a methodical approach to long-term preservation of a broader area on the west bank of the Nile at Luxor.

Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities and the Getty Conservation Institute have entered into a six-year partnership for the conservation and management of the Valley of the Queens, one of the world's most important archeological sites. Building on an earlier collaborative effort which conserved wall paintings in the tomb of Nefertari the new project calls for a methodical approach to long-term preservation of a broader area on the west bank of the Nile at Luxor.

"We are trying to make the neighborhood safe for Nefertari," said Tim Whalen, director of the Getty Conservation Institute. "In the last two years we have evaluated the work we did at the tomb of Nefertari and looked at that in the greater context of the Valley of the Queens. Nefertari has held up extremely well since we completed our work there, but it resides in a complex of about 80 other tombs. We are trying to look at the valley holistically.

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Viewed: 2445 TimesDate: 08/03/2006